Almost universally, students hate textbooks. Well, I'm a student, and this is a textbook. (The price tag of $50 list proves it!) This book from David E. Goldberg serves as a good introduction to business for people who aren't inclined to The Wall Street Journal. Goldberg actually suggests reading the Journal, although I doubt more than 5% of his readers ever will.The Entrepreneurial Engineer

At 200 pages and in a breezy style, The Entrepreneurial Engineer can be easily read in a week (likely 2-3 days if you're dedicated). The book is based around Goldberg's Ten Competencies, each of which becomes a chapter of the book. A number of them are actually overlaps from Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, but this is far more focused on the specifics of business and less on general interpersonal relationships.

The thing that I love about this book is the fourth, fifth, and sixth competencies. Write well, speak well, and "Do Unto Others". There is no reason for anyone to not be able to do these three things. Aside from admonishing those who think they can get by without being able to write and give a product presentation, Goldberg actually offers tips and methods to improve skills.

Yes, giving your presentations to the bathroom mirror actually does work (that's mine, not Goldberg's).

There's also good opinion writing about where Goldberg things the future of business lies.

Due to the prohibitive price, I give this book four libraries out of five. Barnes & Noble link