(via Tony Beavers)

Sunday's New York Times did a piece on how HTML5 allows more information storage on your machine, profiling the EverCookie javascript that was created to stash data about you on your machine in ten different places.

The Times overview of EverCookie and HTML5 storage left out one important detail: standard HTTP cookies, and older, non-HTML5 technologies, can do much of the same thing. The only difference is that Amazon.com would no longer need to store your buying preferences on their servers, but they could opt to store them on your machine.

Because the HTTP cookie is already identifying you personally as a specific Amazon customer, the type of information that can be stored is the same. And because the information is stored on the Amazon servers, there is no way you could ever delete it.

One thing I do like about the article is its reference to browser security settings which are outdated in an HTML5 environment. Does "InPrivate" browsing in IE9 stop storage of cookies? Does it also stop the storage of HTML5 SQLite databases? How about read operations from such a database? Perhaps the better question is, does IE support this newfangled HTML5 at all? (I don't think so.)

The Times would be right about this, if the state of affairs that they were warning about was not already the established state.

Reference