A Donut's Blog

To content | To menu | To search

Tag - YouTube

Entries feed - Comments feed

Monday, October 18 2010

An Election Trend

One thing I've noticed this year is that no candidates are mentioning their own political party in their advertisements. I was watching the news after Sunday Night Football, and every ad during the last three commercial breaks was a political ad. Not one of them said I'm (name), a (party) running for (office) In fact, the only political party that was named was the Democratic party in a PAC spot that said "my Democratic opponent voted for a budget which would have bankrupted the state" (the opponent went unnamed).

Also, the tone of the ads was overwhelmingly negative.

The trend is not limited to television, though. I received pamphlets on my doorstep from candidates for local offices, and none of them mentioned a party. (All Republicans.) There are yard signs on my block, all of which give the candidate's name and the office which he or she is seeking -- but not their political party. Why? Do the consultants think that the labels Republican and Democrat are both damaged? If so, why is nobody running as a third party? The only race with a third party candidate is the Senate race, where the Libertarians have fielded Rebbecca Sink-Burris against Brad Ellsworth and Dan Coats.

And no, not even that spotlight race mentions party in its materials.

And by the way, what the hell is an "Aqua Buddha?" Does anybody else think Paul Conway's campaign manager was high when he approved that? And when was the last time a Democrat trashed a Republican on religion?

Friday, July 16 2010

Using YouTube As A Semi-Serious Communication Method

Via the Washington Post "Campus Overload" blog:

YouTube has other purposes besides providing an open forum to submit your resignation or trying to figure out what Dan Rather just said on a Wednesday night in 1986.

You can find video of serious debates on topics from investigations at Ohio State University to the merits of Darwinism.

But there is a third class of video which can be found in the middle of these other two groups: The serious actor in a non-serious role. Just like Meryl Streep and Pierce Brosnan in Mamma Mia!, these messages can feel out of place but still do very well. (The Mamma Mia! film grossed $144 million)

Which brings me to my local example. Tom Kazee Searches for his Office

I give this one three stars. Its been posted three weeks, been posted a few times on Twitter and Facebook, been spammed to the entire University which he is touring, gotten a plug on the Washington Post blog (mentioned at the top of this post), and still only received 4100 views. I'm sure Evansville's social media consultant Dana Nelson would say that more could have been done with this particular video to help it get out. But at this point, its probably just in the "old" pile. The premise, writing, and performance are reasonable (if occasionally "out of place"), and the reaction I've seen from others around town is that the video is cute.

If cute was the goal, that's good. But webcasting is not the same as broadcasting or publishing. You really have to think about your audience. According to YouTube statistics, most of the viewers of the video were over the age of 50. And here I was thinking this was targeted at current and prospective students as a gesture of good faith that the school's president is interested in learning about the activities they participate in every day.

If my prediction is right, then the marketing didn't work out quite as planned. Of course I could be the one who perceived the purpose wrongly. But hey, I found it cute.